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Editors I Love #SelfPubIsHere

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One of the major factors influencing the rise of respectability in self-publishing has been thanks to professional editors turning freelance.* But how do you find a good one? How do you make sure you aren’t being charged by a charlatan who won’t really improve your book at all? Or worse, take your money and then never respond to you again (yes, this happened to me once). It’s hard, #SelfPubIsHere and we want to publish quality books, but without good editors we cannot do it. To help make your journey a little easier, I’m going to share 9 top quality editors with you. People who would have made this article sparkly and zingy if they had been hired to look at it, and will do just that for your books. [Note: My blog does not use an editor only my books do. Please read my about section to understand why. This blog entry is not a sample of any editor’s work.]

Cait Gordon is a writer and editor. The publishing industry was lucky enough to poach this editor from the world of technical writing where she had 20+ years experience copy editing and technical writing. Now she’s ours and we’re not giving her back, ever. She is not just thorough but kind. Find Cait here. And just in case I don’t say it enough, I love Cait.

Linda Funnell is one of Australia’s most loved editors. What she doesn’t know about Australian English doesn’t actually exist. Very professional and, I know this is a cliche that she’d suggest I cut, a pleasure to work with. Find Linda here. Linda also works alongside Jean Bedford at Newtown Review of Books, who I have found likewise amazing, but I can’t see if she offers professional editing services. You can find Jean here.

Nicola O’Shea came to me recommended by Anita Heiss. Anita Heiss. I’ll just let that sink in. I don’t need to say anything about my positive experiences working with Nicola because a God damn national treasure recommended her and if that isn’tgood enough then I don’t know what is. Find Nicola here.

Tania Chandler! What can I say, I love this woman. She’s an author, writing teacher, and editor. She tackles every job with professionalism and offers clean, professional service. Added bonus, she has a killer sense of humour. Find Tania here.

Georgina Ballentine is a person that embodies dedication. She is passionate about making sure your work is the best reflection of you that it can be. She’s not interested in changing your voice, she’s interested in making it sing. Find Georgina here.

Dionne Lister is a successful author, editor, and leading champion of #SelfPubIsHere. But most importantly, she loves grammar. She runs a Facebook group on grammar. She blogs about grammar. She dreams about grammar. Very thorough, very knowledgeable, very passionate. Find Dionne here.

Jessica Stewart is a gramazon, an Amazon of grammar. She’s here to deliver high kicks to wrong comma usage, chop excessive adverbs and unleash clean flowing sentences. Find Jessica here. Find Jessica’s Robinpedia entry here.

Hot Tree Editing is friendly, cost effective editing. They are thorough and experienced. Their services offer multiple sets of eyes to ensure nothing gets missed. Find Hot Tree here.

Chryse Wymer was the first professional editor I ever worked with and came to me recommended by Dionne Lister. She is an absolute grammar nerd and if she ever reads this blog entry would probably have to begin breathing into a brown paper bag in order to cope with the errors. She’s going to make sure you don’t use the same word to start every paragraph and she’s happy to look up archaic words just to make sure they’re being used correctly. And she has had an extensive education in Australian terms such as root, died in the arse, take the piss, thanks to yours truly. Find Chryse here.

So what are you waiting for? Go get out that manuscript you’ve had gathering dust and get it polished to publication.

See #SelfPubIsHere featured in Books+Publishing here.

Also in Australian Self-Publisher here and you can love them on FB here.

Find out more about #SelfPubIsHere here.

Read about my #SelfPubIsHere dreams here.

Read the article that kicked #SelfPubIsHere off here.

See more about #SelfPubIsHere here.

*Note: historically, many of the authors you love such as Beatrix Potter started out as self-published but later when e-publishing first picked up momentum there was a real push against it. Now with print on demand becoming more accessible the quality and respect is rising again.
Also, cough-cough, find my book at Booktopia or anywhere.

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Miniforce: Attack of Spider Mechamon (Ep 3)

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There are cute rabbits heading towards a dark caveman I’ve got a bad feeling about this. Yep, bad stuff has happened. They’re stuck in a giant spiderweb by some purple glowing stuff.

The villains hi5 and are happy and doing evil stuff. I know they’re evil but they somehow seem nicer than the little girl that Miniforce is living with. I kind of hope they’ve moved out. Nope, she is there. We’re back to the little girl who apparently isn’t a villain and is trying to force them to do her homework. Why are they living in this abusive household?

Of course they don’t finish it because they’re called away to pokeball over to B-grade Captain Barnacles. He sends them off to fight the mechanical spider that has been sucking the life out of bunnies in its web of deceit. Pascal is there, he taunts the miniforce then leaves. They defeat the giant robot spider with their enslaved Transformers. Should we start a petition to free the Transformers?

Hooray, the day is saved and the little girl is super mad because they didn’t do her homework. Seriously, Miniforce, leave. You can do better. Make your own home. Go live with Barnacle. My kids have gone berserk and now want to fight each other because they’re so pumped up on Minforce homework rage. We’re going outside to burn off that energy. I need 7,000 coffees.

Find recap to episode 1 here.

Find recap to episode 2 here.

Miniforce: New Threat (E2)

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Bad guy is the first thing we see. He’s talking to a purple robot armoured dude. Purple dude apparently used to be in Miniforce also. He now hates them for reasons unknown. Come to think of it, bad guy doesn’t have clear reasons either. I have so many questions but it’s too late we’re off to the little girl’s house and she is ordering the animals about to perform the Hunger Games or something similar.

Why does she hang out with them, who is she, why does she wield so much power? She’s so mean to them all the time and yet they stay. Why don’t the live in their headquarters or at in the wilderness?

No time for questions because we’re pokeballing over to B-grade Captain Barnacles.

He explains that the purple dude, Pascal, turned bad so they locked him up. He escaped now they must go find him. Again sketchy on details but they’re off. There don’t seem to be animal hostages this time. It’s just Pascal and henchmen. I don’t know what is happening but there is action and yelling and colours and my 4 year old twins are hugely digging it.

Turns out Pascal can vaporize and then reappear which makes him hard to beat. Then he uses the power of darkness to turn into a giant, actually probably just human sized but looks giant compared to a lizard Only one thing for it. What the heck???? Mini force call in cars that transform into giant robots because of course they have slave transformers tucked away.

They jump inside Voltron style and win. I still don’t know why. I have so many questions! But I’m pretty sure it’s too late for me and I’m now addicted.

Find recap to episode 1 here

Find recap to episode 3 here.

Why Self-Published Authors Are Amazing

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Why Self-Published Authors Are Amazing

All the reasons you should love self-published authors articulated beautifully.

Ask Alianne

If you’re following my blog, you’ve seen me post some rants about this or that. I do it to air out my own personal grievances, but also to shed some light on current events happening in the book world. Cathartic and educational. Win-win.

But today, I want to do something different. Today I want to tip my hat and give a nod to every self-published author out there, because the Indie community is a truly amazing and humbling place. Yes, it has its problems–all communities do–but on the whole, its members are some of the kindest, bravest, most supportive, most intelligent people I’ve ever had the pleasure of meeting.

Too often, the label of “Indie author” or “self-published author” still evokes the unfair stigma of being sub par, unworthy when compared to authors on the other side of that gilded line of traditional publishing. Today, I want to show you…

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NSW Premier’s Literary Awards According to Twitter

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As a follow up to my post listing the winners of the NSW Literary Awards, hosted by the gorgeous NSW State Library, I’ll give you a summary of the evening via a series of tweets:

NSW Premier’s Literary Awards 2018

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Okay, okay, I know what you all want to know, who won the various categories of the NSW Premier’s Literary Awards, so I’ll just dive right in and give the list.
Multicultural NSW Award ($20,000 — sponsored by Multicultural NSW)
The Permanent Resident by Roanna Gonsalves (UWA Publishing)


Nick Enright Prize for Playwriting ($30,000)
Black is the New White by Nakkiah Lui (Sydney Theatre Company)

Betty Roland Prize for Scriptwriting ($30,000)
JOINT WINNERS:
Deep Water: The Real Story written by Amanda Blue and Jacob Hickey (Blackfella Films)
Top of the Lake: China Girl, Series 2 Episode 4 ‘Birthday’ written by Jane Campion and Gerard Lee (See-Saw Films)


Patricia Wrightson Prize for Children’s Literature ($30,000)
How to Bee by Bren MacDibble (Allen & Unwin)

Ethel Turner Prize for Young People’s Literature ($30,000)
The Ones That Disappeared by Zana Fraillon (Hachette Australia)


Kenneth Slessor Prize for Poetry ($30,000)
Argosy by Bella Li (Vagabond Press)

Indigenous Writers’ Prize ($30,000) — biennial award
Taboo by Kim Scott (Pan Macmillan Australia)

Douglas Stewart Prize for Non-fiction ($40,000)
Passchendaele: Requiem for Doomed Youth by Paul Ham (Penguin Random House Australia)


UTS Glenda Adams Award for New Writing ($5,000 — sponsored by UTS)
The Book of Dirt by Bram Presser (Text Publishing)

Christina Stead Prize for Fiction ($40,000)
The Book of Dirt by Bram Presser (Text Publishing)


People’s Choice Award
The Book of Dirt by Bram Presser (Text Publishing)

Book of the Year ($10,000)
Taboo by Kim Scott (Pan Macmillan Australia)

Find out more about the awards and what the judges thought from Lisa Fleetwood.

Find out what Books + Publishing have to say about the awards.

Find out what Lisa Hill has to say.

Find my Twitter highlights package here.

Lest We Forget, Lest We Repeat

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Poppy artwork in honour of Anzac Day by Sillier than Sally Designs

103 years ago Australian and New Zealand forces landed at Gallipoli. Their aim was to capture the capital of the Ottoman Empire, a staunch supporter of Germany, and to open up the Gallipoli Peninsula and thus the Black Sea to the Allied forces. Australian and New Zealand servicemen were dropped off at the wrong location and soon found themselves in a stalemate with no hope of progressing. After 8 months of futility and death the Anzac forces were evacuated. Over 11,000 Australian and New Zealanders died during these 8 months. Being countries with such low populations the effects were devastating.

In 1915 when news reached Australia and New Zealand that servicemen had landed in Gallipoli celebrations were held. New Zealand and had a half day celebration, Australia made speeches. People were proud that their servicemen were making a meaningful strike against the German Empire. But these soldiers that both nations were so proud of never stood a chance of meeting their mission. They were sent to the wrong landing site. It was decided to drop them off anyway despite the location being geographically impossible for the Allies to win from. On the morning of April 25th 1915 a dawn service was held for the soldiers before setting them off to be slaughtered.
This futile campaign came to help create both the New Zealand and Australian national idinties and has been credited for developing New Zealand’s fiercely independent nature. They would never again be commanded into slaughter. It also forged our two countries even closer with a bond made from shared grief, bravery and blood. Before we were neighbours, afterwards our two countries became like brothers. And we still have that same sibling rivalry but also deep love for one another to this day.
Anzac Day was first celebrated only one year later, in 1916. Only four months after troops had been evacuated. It was celebrated not only in Australia and New Zealand but also in England and Egypt. The dawn service that had been held as a last mass for many of the soldiers deployed became part of this celebration. To get up, in the cold dark, and to think about your maker and sacrifice. This tradition still holds.
Lest we forget. Lest repeat.