Category Archives: Robinpedia

Jessica Stewart: #Robinpedia

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Jessica Stewart isn’t a Grammar Nazi, she’s a Grammar Amazonian Warrior. A Grammazon if you will. She’s the editor who is willing to slice off excessive descriptives with her chakram and high kick your scenes into a more effective order. Oh, and she has a black belt in Taekwondo.

Words are an addiction for this Sydney based editor and writer. Jessica Stewart is a member of Editors NSW, part of the Black Pheonix Publishing Collective (which sounds like something from a Xena episode), is in the Institute of Professional Editors directory, and not sated with her qualification in Editing and Publishing she has gone on to study for her Masters. On top of this, so committed to the Australian writing scene is Jessica Stewart that she volunteers for the Sydney Writers’ Festival.

Jessica Stewart’s services through Your Second Draft include, but are not limited to:

  • Structural editing
  • Copy editing
  • Proofing
  • Business writing and editing
  • Ghostwriting
  • Technical and operational writing 
  • Coporate writing
  • Complex submissions

In the end, the choice is yours. If you want some rigid, grump, nay saying your work, by all means hire a Grammar Nazi, but if you want someone who has many skills and will literally whip your manuscript into shape, then go with the Xena of the Australian editing scene, Jessica Stewart.

Find Jessica Stewart’s Your Second Draft editing services here.

Get a face full of Jessica Stewart here.

Tweet with Jessica Stewart here.
FYI: No she did not edit this. This entry is in no way a reflection on Jessica’s capabilities. This entry maintains the same ethos of sharing my thoughts in their wild and untamed form, complete in my dyslexic glory. Check out my About here.

Read more about Robinpedia here

Read about my experience of being a dyslexic writer here.

Read about my opinion on author branding here.

Buy my shit at Booktopia or here.

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Helen Thurloe: #Robinpedia

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Helen Thurloe is a writer in the purest sense of the word, she’ll write anything. She has been known to write poems, essays, text messages, shopping list, and a novel. She’s even made legit postcards! Her text messages and shopping lists have thus far been cruelly ignored by awards and scholarships but her other stuff seems to be going alright…

… And by alright I mean her poetry has won prizes including- ACU Literature Prize, Banjo Patterson Writing Award, The Age of Reinvention, Ethel Webb Bundell Literary Award and has been shortlisted and commended in many others. Her debut novel Promising Azra through Allen & Unwin has been similarly well received with manuscript development prizes such as Varuna Writers’ House Fellowship, NSW Writers’ Centre Fellowship, Children’s Book Council Frustrated Writers Mentorship, Charlotte Warring Barton Award and the completed, published novel was shortlisted for prestigious awards such as the New South Wales Premiere Literary Awards. Vanessa Bond does much of the media on that award and is a babe. We all love Vanessa. Send lots of love to the State Library of New South Wales because they deserve it.

On seeing this cover my twins drew all over themselves with a SHARPIE, do not show to under 3s.

Diverting from Robinpedia for a moment: As a former English teacher, I taught for a little over a decade before leaving to pursue writing, I would personally highly recommend Promising Azra to any English teacher. It would work particularly well for year 10 because it is a very easy read. The novel is set in an Australian high school with the main characters being from a south Asian background. The book focuses on Azra, who is smart, doing incredibly well in school and thinking about going to university when it is revealed that her parents have arranged a marriage to someone she has never met in Pakistan. As Azra struggles her friend Layla is looking forward to her arranged marriage as a chance to get out of school early. The book is highly nuanced with examination of how we are of our families but also our own people and how that conflict plays out. The stakes are incredibly high, Azra’s future, but also realistic.

 

Back to Robinpedia

Helen Thurloe has set aside a dynamic workspace for herself in her home. It has a computer, an exercise bike, and a laundry basket. As an owner of an ergonomic furniture business she also ensures that she works in a manner that is healthy for her body with equipment that is easily adjusted for sitting and standing.

This is how I picture her working

Find Helen Thurloe’s Website here.

Love Helen Thurloe on twitter here.

Follow Helen Thurloe on Facebook here.

If there is any information that you feel would enhance this entry please feel free to leave it in the comment section. 

Read more about Robinpedia here

Read about my experience of being a dyslexic writer here.

Read about my opinion on author branding here.

Buy my shit at Booktopia or here.

Evi O: #Robinpedia

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Evi O is a Sydney based designer and one half of the team at OetomoNew. She started her artistic journey drawing stickfigures in primary school, then progressed to completing a design degree at university and now designs award winnning books. Evi O is devoted to designing beautiful books and formerly worked for Lantern Books, an imprint of Penguin Random House.
As a child Evi O found herself obsessed with a pop-up book of Snow White. Not so much for the story (seriously what a snoozer, living in the forest with 7 dudes whilst you’re escaping from your evil stepmother, happens all the time, amirightoramiright) but for all the design features and how they all interacted. She studied the book so that she too could make book art.

Her love of beautiful books was nearly disrupted when she got into a Business degree at university. Fortunately she swapped to a design degree and ended up studying Visual Communications at UTS. Her mother was a tad devo as she felt business was a more secure field than the arts.

In her career Evi O has taken on many high profile books such as the gorgeous book for T2, Matt Moran’s Dinner at Matt’s (Special Edition), and the multi-award winning Things I Love.
Evi O says thatif you want to get into the book design industry you need to be pushy, bang on the door and jam your foot in there once it’s open and to get to know people. The Australian Book Design association is a great way to get to know people.

Find Evi O’s website here.

Find Evi O on Twitter here.

Find OetomoNew here.

If there is any information that you believe would enhance this entry please feel free to leave it in the comment section. 

Read more about Robinpedia here

Read about my experience of being a dyslexic writer here.

Read about my opinion on author branding here.

Buy my shit here.

Julie Koh: #Robinpedia

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Julie Koh has been described as ‘the brightest new star in Australia’s literary galaxy’ by Louise Swinn. Oh God, I can already tell that this is one of those entries that will have me feeling so inadequate by the time I finish the research that I end up crying in the shower whilst drinking… again. Deep breath. She studied Politics and Law at the University of Sydney but quit corporate law to peruse writing.

Spineless Wonders published her first story collection, Capital Misfits, in 2015. This same collection was also picked up by Math Paper Press in 2016 and published with illustrations by Matt Huynh. Portable Curiosities was also published in 2016, through UQP.

Portable Curiosities, Julie Koh’s first full length collection, was met with critical praise. It was shortlisted for the Readings Prize for New Australian Fiction, the Queensland Literary Awards, the Steel Rudd Award, New South Wales Premiere Literary Awards, the UTS Glenda Adams Award, to list just a few…. These are happy tears of congratulations I’m crying, not envy.

Julie Koh’s fiction can be hard to pin down, so is at times classified as Weird Fiction as it it quite literary but with speculative elements. This has surprised her as she felt that her writing was quite normal. It is set around real issues and sure there’s the odd god or ghost, but hey that’s just life. People in Julie Koh’s family on her mother’s side are quite spiritual and can see ghosts.

 

On her down time she is also one of the founding members of Kanganoulipo, a super secret writing sect tasked with shaking up the landscape of Australian literature. Former Robinpedia entrant, Jane Rawson, is also part of this top secret collective. So keep your eyes, including the third one, peeled. 

Find Julie Koh’s website here.

Tweet with Julie Koh here.

Like Julie Koh on Facebook here.

If there is any information that you have that you believe would enhance this entry, please leave it in the comment section. 

Read more about Robinpedia here

Read about my experience of being a dyslexic writer here.

Read about my opinion on author branding here.

Buy my shit here.


Dianne Blacklock: #Robinpedia

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In a Robinpedia first, I’m adding the mother of an already existing Robinpediaed entity. Please set your hands to applause for Australian author Dianne Blacklock. 

Dianne Blacklock is a Sydney writer and has published 9 books through Pan Macmillan. She writes about people and relationships. She also hosts “A Conversation With…” authors series on her blog. Authors such as Liane Moriarty and the Robinpediaed Lisa Heidke have been interviewed in this series.

If you’re a slush pile swimmer in need of inspiration look no further than Dianne Blacklock. At 39 her unsolicited manuscript was fished out of the bog of eternal slush at Pan Macmillan. A year later she had a book contract. It can happen. You can break out of the slush. It’s too late for me, but just keep swimming. SAVE YOURSELVES!

I was lucky enough to have Dianne Blacklock as a special guest star at Emily Maguire’s Year of the Novel through the New South Wales Writers’ Centre. She is incredibly generous with sharing her words of wisdom with aspiring writers. Dianne Blacklock emphasised that whatever approach you wanted to take to writing you would find experts who vehemently disagreed with it…. BUT you would also find experts that agreed with you, so just do what works for you. If it works, it’s right.
Apparently when not writing Dianne Blacklock has a love of cleaning and inventing chores. And she’s got enough to go around. You get a chore, you get a chore, everybody gets a chore…. So…. like…. don’t visit when she’s not writing?
Find Dianne Blacklock’s website here.

Face Dianne Blacklock here.

Tweet with Dianne Blacklock here.

Read Dianne Blacklock’s blog here.

If you have any info that you believe would enhance this entry, please leave it in the comment section.

Read more about Robinpedia here

Read about my thoughts on being a dyslexic writer here.

Read about my thoughts on author branding here.

Buy my shit here.


Alison Green: #Robinpedia

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Alison Green was named one of Westpac and Australian Financial Review’s 100 Women of Influence in 2016. She is the CEO and co-founder of Pantera Press. She is on the Board of Directors for New South Wales Writers’ Centre, and sits on the Australian Publishers Association Trade Committee and the Australian Publishers Association’s Independent Publishers Committee. On top of that she has the most impressive balayage in the entire Australian publishing industry. Yes, that includes writers and cover designers.

Pantera Press are often thought of as the caring publishers because they take their unsolicited manuscripts seriously. In fact each submission is read by five commissioning editors on their iPads to ensure it has the best chance of reaching an editor to champion it. This approach has led to rumours that every editor, no matter how short the hair, has balayage. They are so engrossed in their reading that they often don’t move for hours. This has resulted in hairdressers just keeping on processing their hair, so as to not waste a seat, until they leave ultimately with balayage, the most time consuming process.

Cementing the caring company ethos Alison Green’s Pantera Press not only donates to The Footpath Library, Mission Australia, Misfit Aid, and Let’s Read, but also encourage their readers to get involved where possible. Links and information can be found on their website.

However, it’s not all fun, philanthropy and great hair under the leadership of Alison Green. She can wield her power with an iron fist… wrapped around a table tennis bat. In fact, team meetings often end in a rousing game of table tennis, or as I like to think of them, challenge matches. There can be only one.

Table tennis is life!

After scouring the Pantera Press Facebook page I have uncovered an important fact. Once you sign with Pantera Press Alison Green gives you a bottle of Moet
Additional note, Alison Green is also employer of James Read who wrote How to Lose a Publisher in 10 Days. I literally laughed out loud at part 5…. And no more drinking and over sharing at writer functions…. although I do have a book out about time literally spent in a psychiatric hospital…. pen name? In all seriousness, don’t kill James’ love fern. Because otherwise he has to explain the death to Alison whilst playing table tennis and getting balayage. 

Find Alison Green on Twitter here.

Submit to the will of the Panterian Empire here.

Read the Pantera Press blog here.

Check out Pantera on Facebook here.
If you have additional information that you believe could improve this entry, please leave it in the comment section.

Typical day in the office at Pantera Press.

Read more about Robinpedia here

Natasha Lester: #Robinpedia

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Natasha Lester is an Australian writer with a Masters in Creative Writing and a PhD in being farken fabulous. When she isn’t writing she enjoys yoga, sorting through her extensive lipstick collection, buying shoes, and drinking gin. I believe her gin cupboard looks something like this. 

Prior to entering the Australian authorial world Natasha Lester worked in public relations and marketing. She has worked for heavyweights such as L’Oréal, Maybelline and Harlequin. Thankfully she abandoned the glamorous life of PR and became a povo writer instead. It involves just as much drinking of gin but far less money.

 

Lester’s first book, What is Left Over, After was published by Freemantle Press in 2010.She did what any first time author would do and took a bunch of shelfies. Don’t pretend that we don’t all do it. This was followed up in 2012 with If I should Lose You. For her third book, Lester switched to writing historical romance. She released A Kiss From Mr Fitzgerald in 2016 through Hachette, this was quickly followed up by Her Mother’s Secret in 2017.

 

When Natasha Lester isn’t doing yoga whilst writing and applying lipstick she teaches writing. Frequently through The Australian Writers’ Centre.

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Find Natasha Lester’s website here

 

Chat to Natasha Lester on Twitter here

 

Drop Natasha Lester a line on Facebook here

 

Grab her books here

 

Check out my review of A Kiss From Mr Fitzgerald for Newtown Review of Books here

 

Read more about Robinpedia here

 

Buy my shit here