The Kirribilli Club: #Robinpedia

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A view from the Kirribilli Club.

The Kirribilli Club is located on Harbourview Crescent in Lavender Bay. It is practically right next door to the Australian Writers’ Centre’s Sydney branch. Kirribilli Club has a history as an Ex-Services Club and is  a member owned not for profit organisation. However it does have Dedes Watergrill restaurant, Sunset Cafe, U-Bar, Sports bar and a stylish cocktail lounge. Given the scurrilous, yet somewhat true, rumour about writers and their love of liquor I don’t think I need to say why this place is a valid entry for Robinpedia…

… but since when have I ever been subtle? Given that Lavender Bay can be a tad quiet on weekends, as it’s mostly seen as a business area, the Kirribilli Club has become an important source of nourishment for students, of the Australian Writers’ Centre Sydney branch, that forget their lunches. And given that writers, both students and masters do a love a tipple, it is at times popular after classes for impromptu “writers’ meetings” and the partaking of “writers’ juice.” It has been said that even internationally renowned authors have been spotted there, drinking their “juice” and “meeting” away… it has been said by me, because I have seen them and “juiced” with them.

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A view from the Australian Writers' Centre. Notice the similarity in view with the Kirribilli Club.

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If you have any further information that you believe should be added to this entry then please write it in the comment section of this post.

How to Take Book Week Easy Without Resorting to Cartoon Character Costumes.

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Full disclosure, I am a writer, an avid reader, a former English teacher, and worked in a library whilst doing my degrees. In short, I love books. I think that Book Week is fantastic and an important time to celebrate reading and writing. We celebrate sport and movie stars all the time, so it’s great to have a time to celebrate books.

And for me, that’s what Book Week is all about, celebrating books. It’s a chance to bring the spirit of fandom to books. My children’s school asked for children to dress up as characters from Australian books, which I thought was a lovely way to demonstrate support for the Australian book industry. It also helped really focus on celebrating books and not simply rehashing disney costumes that the kids already wear on weekends or football jerseys. Kids already celebrate their love of these things all the time so it was lovely to see books truly get given the focus they deserve.

But finding costumes for Australian books is hard and I already have superhero costumes at home and my kid loves heroes and although they know of the heroes through TV they are originally from comicBOOKS, I hear some fellow parents say. Don’t I have enough stress without adding book week? And I understand that, I really do. But I’ve got good news on both fronts. There are some really easy to costume Australian books, and it’ll open up discussions with your children about Australian literature. Talking about books can be exciting not stressful. Think of it as a fun thing where you get to learn about new books rather a drain on your time and sanity. So how about I give you some examples of easy to costume Australian books to take some stress out of the idea?

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For little kids still into picture books, Andrew Daddo is an awesome source of costuming. To be the little girl from I Do It all you need is a green dress, some red and white striped tights, and a toy monkey. You’ve possibly got something similar left over from the festive season. So the costume is easy and you get to talk about and read this fantastic book. I also love Andrew Daddo’s Cheeky Monkey. A stripey shirt and red tracksuit pants or a blue shirt and yellow tracksuit pants has you costumed and reading a great story.

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Do your kids love the word bum? Mine do. Tim Winton’s Bugalugs Bum Thief is super easy to costume. Hawaiian shirt, board shorts, bucket hat and a rope around the waist. Heck, Tim Winton also wrote Lockie Leonard, that’s another source of beachwear for any of your mini surfers and kids love those stories.

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Sorry, my children only like pirates. GREAT. Introduce your kids to Andy Griffiths’ Tree House series. They can go as Captain Wooden Head.

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My kid only dresses like princesses. Fabulous. Pamela Freeman has you covered with Princess Betony.

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Actually I meant swashbuckling hero types not pirates or Princesses. Fine, Allison Tait’s Map Maker series is for you.

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Are there any casual costumes out there? Glad you asked. Deborah Abela’s Max Remy Super Spy books were a huge hit with my nieces. Cargo pants, orange top, and you’re ready become a spy.

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My kid loves skateboarding. Anita Heiss has you covered with Harry’s Secret. A skateboard, and an Indigenous flag sticker for it.

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My daughter loves pretty dresses and pigs. Check and checkmate. Here’s Jacqueline Harvey with Clementine Rose. Blue dress, red bow, red shoes, and a toy pig. You’re done.

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I want to dress my kid as an animal. Great. Koalas, possums, and wombats are in a huge amount of picture books. You can’t swing a dingo in an Australian picture book festival without hitting an animal book.

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This is crazy, but I just happen to have a giant unicycle lying about my place, is there anyway I could incorporate that into Book Week. Why yes, yes you can. A.B. Paterson’s Mulga Bill’s Bicycle is an oldie but a goldie.

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I want my kid to wear my old nightie and a shower cap. Ooookay… that’s oddly specific but I can help you out there too. Try Seven Little Australians.

There are so many Australian authors out there with great books and easy costumes to make. Book week is a fabulous opportunity to google them, read them, and fall in love with them. So in 2017 I challenge you to catch the Book Week fever. Next year you can choose a book week costume that is just as quick and easy as a store bought dress up costume but has the added bonus of talking about Australian books and bringing the spirit of fandom to reading. Let’s really love books! Get excited about new books and let your kids catch your enthusiasm. Show them that there are more things to be excited about than those costumes that they already own and love.

The New South Wales Writers’ Centre Stick ( AKA #nswwcStick ): #Robinpedia

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The New South Wales Writers Centre Stick, affectionately dubbed #nswwcStick, also known as the Calliope Stick, was gifted upon the New South Wales Writers’ Centre by the great muse Calliope on the 13th of July 2016. Calliope is the chief of all muses and presides over epic poetry. The stick was discovered at the foot of the Centre by Bridget Lutherborrow.

The New South Wales Writers’ Centre was ecstatic to receive the gift after the muses fled the centre when Laura Jean McKay annouced that they didn’t exist at the Emerging Writers’ Festival Roadshow in the November of 2014. The muses took the news that they weren’t real quite badly and refused to speak to anyone in Sydney until the fateful day of July 13 2016 when they did leave the sacred stick.

The celebrations of the Calliope Stick were heralded in song and on twitter. #nswwcStick started to trend after post-literary-automoton Mal Neil asked for there to be a hashtag. Writer/editor/proofreader Alan Vaarwerk felt that the New South Writers’ Centre should become “all about the stick.” Whereas writer and sneezer Patrick Lenton wanted to explore the philosophical ramifications of the stick.

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Unfortunately all this stimulation was cut short when the stick went missing. Nobody knows exactly when it happened or how but there have been several theories. The two most credible theories are:

1) A rival writers’ centre, jealous of the favour shown and the inspiration received, did set out and steal the holy stick.

2) The stick had been known for throwing parties and inviting friends over. It is thought that a Centre member got tired of the mess and cast the stick out into the void.

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However, as no witnesses have come forward it is all just pure speculation. But for a time we lived and breathed from the Calliope Stick. And it was great.

At some point, someone did attempt to pass off an imitation stick as THE Stick, but nobody was fooled.

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For more information on #Robinpedia click here.

If you know more information that could help improve this entry please leave it in the comment section on this entry.

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Walter Mason: #Robinpedia

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Walter Mason is a Sydney based writer, mentor, and teacher. He has worked in every part of the book industry and is one of Australia’s foremost literary citizens who always encourages the spirit of generosity and giving back to the writing community. His principles of Literary Citizenship can be found HERE</.

Walter Mason is the author of two travel memoirs, Destination Saigon and Destination Cambodia. Both have been well received by readers and critics.

Walter Mason teachers writing courses through WEA Sydney, City of Sydney Alexandria Library, NSW Writers Centre and many other locations around Sydney. His courses Fabulously Creative, Creative Groove and The Mindful Writer are particularly popular amongst writers.

Walter is so popular amongst Sydney writers that he has accumulated a group of followers affectionately dubbed Walterites. Some noted Walterites include writers:

Claire Scobie http://clairescobie.com/

Vanessa Berry https://vanessaberryworld.wordpress.com/

Sharon Livingstone http://sharonlivingstone.com/

Ashley Kalagian Blunt https://www.clippings.me/akblunt

MEEEEEEE!!! You’re here already!!!

 

Walter Mason is one of the founding members of The Universal Heart Book Club. This is an online book club and podcast which focuses on books that refresh and enhance your spirit.

 

Find Walter Mason’s Website HERE.

Find Walter Mason on Twitter HERE.

Find Walter Mason on Facebook HERE.

Subscribe to Walter Mason’s Enewsletter HERE.

Find The Universal Heart Book Club HERE.

 

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Please feel free to comment with extra information that you would like  me to add to this Robinpedia entry. Particularly if you wish to be added to the list of Walterites. As I always say, if you don’t love Walter Mason you have either never met him or have no soul.

Learn more about Robinpedia HERE.

Lisa Fleetwood: #Robinpedia

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Lisa Fleetwood is an Australian author and book reviewer.

Lisa Fleetwood is the author of the Amazon Bestselling travel memoir Destination Dachshund.

Lisa Fleetwood became known in the Australian writing scene for her book reviews posted on Welcome to my Library and her coverage of Literary Awards.

Lesser known about Lisa Fleetwood is that she holds quarterly writing retreats in her home for up and coming writers that have been highly praised by their select attendees.

 

Find Lisa Fleetwood’s website HERE.

Find Lisa Fleetwood on twitter HERE.

Find Lisa Fleetwood on Facebook HERE.

 

Please feel free to tell me additional information about this writer that you would like added to this Robinpedia entry in the comment section.

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Learn more about Robinpedia HERE.

Lola Lowe: #Robinpedia

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Lola Lowe is an Australian writer, cake baker and lover of wine.

She is the author of Stuck Up which is a novel at the intersection of chick lit and mystery. Stuck Up was declared a page turner in May’s Cosmopolitan.

Lola has pioneered the technique of using cocktail swizzle sticks in order to plan out novels and over come writers block.

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Find her on Facebook here.

Find her on Twitter here.

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Please feel free to add a comment with any more information that you feel should be included about this author. I am always happy to update.

Find out more about #Robinpedia here.

Toni Jordan: #Robinpedia

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Image taken from Toni Jordan's official website.

Toni Jordan is an Australian author, writer-mentor, and guest panelist on The Book Club ABC hosted by Jennifer Byrne. She is well known for her enthusiasm for books, love of socks and willingness to engage up and coming authors.

Toni Jordan has published four books:

Addition (2008), published through Text Publishing. Long listed for the Miles Franklin Literary Award in 2009. Short listed for the Barbara Jefferis Award in 2009. Best Debut Fiction for the Indie Awards 2008. Shortlisted Best Newcomer for the Australian Book Industry Award 2008. Best Themed Fiction for UK Medical Journalists Association 2008.

Fall Girl (2010), published through Text Publishing.

Nine Days (2012), published through Text Publishing. Best Fiction for the Indie Awards 2012, shortlisted Best General Fiction for Australian Independent Bookseller Award 2013.

Our Tiny Useless Hearts (2016), published by Text Publishing.

Toni Jordan has also written for The Guardian, Courier Mail, and The Age.

Toni Jordan is the only author in Australia known to have a dedicated fan page to her socks on Pinterest.

Toni Jordan’s website can be found here.

Toni Jordan twitter account can be found here.

Toni Jordan Facebook page can be found here.

I will continue to edit this page as I find more information. Please feel free to comment with more information that can be included.

Find out more about Robinpedia here.